All posts by Yasminah Abdullah, M.S., CCC-SLP

About Yasminah Abdullah, M.S., CCC-SLP

Ms.Yasminah Abdullah, M.S., CCC-SLP is a principal Speech-Language Pathologist at Total Speech Therapy

Does a Child Under Your Care Require Speech Therapy?

Wouldn’t it be great if an ASHA certified speech and language pathologist could teach you how to identify a child who is exhibiting speech-language disorder?

Total Speech Therapy’s lead speech-language pathologist, Yasminah Abdullah, M.S., CCC-SLP, will be conducting complimentary seminars for teachers, caregivers, and healthcare professionals from August 28 to Nov., 15, 2014.

Each seminar will run for 45 minutes. During the presentations Yasminah will address the following topics:

  • Speech/language development milestones
  • Causes of speech and language problems
  • An overview of speech and language disorders
  • Therapy options available to your child
  • Insurance and eligibility for speech therapy programs

By the end of the seminar, we hope to equip your staff with pre-screening basics and how to refer a child under your care to a speech therapy professional. The presentation is free of charge, and we will run these programs annually as part of our community outreach program.

To book a seminar date at your location kindly call Tel: 410-696-3301.

Language Therapy

Language Therapy

Children can sometimes have difficulty understanding the uses of various parts of speech. This is where language therapy can assist. Even as adults we remember the meaning of certain parts of speech like noun, verb and adjective but may forget what is exactly meant by a correlative conjunction or linking verb so it is not so unusual when a child is unsure. In language therapy we can address the parts of speech that are difficult for your child to understand and then focus on those areas which is a great way to develop exceptional literacy skills as he/she gets older.

We Travel To You!

In our years of experience, we have seen significant treatment results when we are able to work with patients in their own environments. Traveling to the patient allows us to interact and work with them in a comfortable and familiar setting, which produces optimal results. Another benefit of having mobile therapists, is that we have an opportunity to communicate with the primary healthcare providers, which enables us to work effectively within the targets set for the patient.

Looking Forward to Hearing From You!

My team and I look forward to hearing from you in the near future. You have my personal and professional promise that we will work with you, with the utmost commitment, to provide the best possible care and treatment for your patients.

Yasminah Abdullah, M.S., CCC-SLP
410-696-3301.

Articulation Therapy

Articulation Therapy

Children say the cutest things like, “Can I pleathe hab a cookie.” Stuff like that is cheek-pinch worthy however this is a sign of a problem and should be addressed early in order to prevent a habit from forming. If you notice your child omitting letters, adding letters or substituting letters in words, an assessment with an SLP is a good idea. This sort of speech issue can be solved a lot more easily the earlier it is addressed.

We Travel To You!

In our years of experience, we have seen significant treatment results when we are able to work with patients in their own environments. Traveling to the patient allows us to interact and work with them in a comfortable and familiar setting, which produces optimal results. Another benefit of having mobile therapists, is that we have an opportunity to communicate with the primary healthcare providers, which enables us to work effectively within the targets set for the patient.

Looking Forward to Hearing From You!

My team and I look forward to hearing from you in the near future. You have my personal and professional promise that we will work with you, with the utmost commitment, to provide the best possible care and treatment for your patients.

Yasminah Abdullah, M.S., CCC-SLP
410-696-3301.

Brain Fitness

Few days ago I had the pleasure of presenting a seminar on Brain Fitness to a group of LPs and OTs, Clients, and Caregivers. I thought of sharing a my lecture notes in our TST.com blog.

The seminar main points can be summarize as following:

What is Brain Fitness?

  • Brain fitness is the capacity of a person to meet the various cognitive demands of daily life.
  • The ability to assimilate information, connect relationships, and develop reasonable conclusions and plans.
  • Having a fit brain means that you possess the thinking and feeling abilities required to work productively, sustain meaningful personal relationships, and achieve your goals in life.
  • Just as a professional athlete sets various physical fitness goals, everyone gets to set their own brain fitness performance goals that can change over time at each stage in our lives.

Why is Brain Fitness Important?

  • Brain fitness is as important as physical fitness. Just as you can exercise your arms, legs, and abdominal muscles; you can also exercises your memory, attention, problem solving and other memory tasks. As with physical exercise, exercising your brain can help your improve your overall performance and to feel your best!
  • Studies have shown that “early detection” of cognitive (memory) impairment is a preventative method that can reduce an individual’s risk or rate of cognitive decline and/or dementia.

What is Brain Training?

  • The structured and efficient use of mental exercises designed to build targeted brain-based networks and capacities.
  • Goal is to improve specific brain functions, similar to physical conditioning training.
  • “neurons that fire together wire together” – repeatedly stimulating/training a specific network of neurons results in new and strengthened connections in this network.

Our principal SLP Ms.Yasminah Abdullah can be reached at yasminah@totaspeechtherapy.com

Pediatric Speech-Language Therapy Program

At Total Speech Therapy we provide high-quality evaluations and therapy for children with speech- language disorders, delays and disabilities. Family members and/or caregivers play a key role in our individual client-based approach, and are involved every step of the way. Our speech-language pathologists work collaboratively with family, physicians and related professionals, to ensure that the child gets the state-of-the-art services and support they need to succeed. Our therapists have advanced training and experience working with diagnoses including.

  • Phonological Disorders
  • Auditory Processing Disorders
  • Craniofacial abnormalities
  • Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)
  • Genetic Syndromes Articulation and Motor Speech Disorders Voice Disorders
  • Neurological Disorders
  • Expressive and Receptive Language Disorders
  • Fluency/Stuttering Semantic and/or pragmatic Language Disorders
  • Sensory Integration Disorders Feeding or Swallowing Problems

Please contact us to learn more about the Pediatric Speed-Language Therapy Program. Referrals for speech therapy outpatient services may be made by physicians, community agencies, insurance companies, healthcare professionals. family members, or caregivers.

A day in the life of a Speech Pathologist

Every morning I wake up with a feeling of excitement about what the day ahead will hold.  Today could be the day for a speech breakthrough, my child can’t speak could turn into my child won’t stop talking, an embarrassing stutter could smooth out into something soulful. Anything is possible.

I try to limit the number of patients I see per day so I can give more time to each person – from preparing for the speech therapy session to working through it and then spending some time afterward to reflect and tweak it to pull more from the patient. Now, don’t get me wrong here, I don’t become the drill sergeant speech therapist pushing patients beyond limits – far from it.

By pulling a little more I mean tapping into the strength that is already there but just needs a little awakening nudge. That’s often where stories of miracle recoveries come from – when the untapped inner power is unleashed.

If I am seeing a new patient I will prepare for an assessment session which will help in determining exactly the type of therapy a patient needs. The goal of course is to get the patient functional, but for example if your child does not speak at all then we will start communication through pictures before moving to speaking mode so that the transition is gentle. In some cases we use electronic Augmentative Alternative  Communication (AAC) devices which can really help children that are withdrawn open up since they find it easier to connect through a device – it is really quite fascinating.

I believe parental or caregiver participation in the healing process is absolutely essential for success. So a typical day can include a speech therapy session with the patient and then a consulting session with the parent or caregiver. What goes on at home has a big impact on how effective the speech therapy will be so I provide tips on what you can do at home to enforce what is taught during the speech and language therapy sessions.

I specialize in speech and swallowing therapies related to neurological disorders so a typical day will also include consultations with doctors who are looking for a speech and language pathologist (SLP) to join the rehabilitation team.

I then provide special after-school sessions for kids and evening sessions for adults. The days can be long but since I run my own practice I space out the sessions throughout the day based on patient needs while ensuring I schedule in a coffee and chocolate break for myself in between (healthy bitter chocolate of course:)

No matter how long the day is I am always ready to go early the next morning since a new day means coming face to face with little miracles that make it all so worth it.

I love my job!

Being able to help someone find their voice is truly a wonderful thing and I am lucky enough to be able to do that every single day. I am a speech-language pathologist (SLP) which means it is my job to help people significantly improve the quality of their lives. And more selfishly, I get a chance to see more miracles on a daily basis than most people do in a lifetime – the thrill of that never gets old – I absolutely love what I do!

I think I first fell in love with speech therapy in grad school when I was introduced to alternative forms of communication. I took a course on Augmentative Alternative  Communication (AAC), which lucky for me  was taught by an extremely passionate professor. She didn’t just teach about devices, but rather about how simple machines could transform lives. And they really can, I have been fortunate enough to see this transformation with my very eyes. It is something like watching a character in a black and white move see colour.

Every day is a new challenge since my speech and language therapy practice is geared toward helping both children and adults, who often have very different issues. A major part of my practice focus on neurological illnesses such as Parkinson’s Disease which can be devastating since patients have used speech and language their whole lives and have relearn something they likely thought they would never lose. On the other hand, working with children can be a completely different challenge such as children with Autism Spectrum Disorder who may have never spoken before and have to be encouraged to communicate with the outside world even though they might not understand why they would want to.

My job is a challenge but the rewards are big. I get to play a part in all sorts of wonderful stories and one of  my favourites took place not too long ago. I was introduced to a 40-year old woman who had suffered a stroke. When we first met I could see she was pretty down on herself and seemed quite unmotivated. I was told that she had been a positive, active woman with a full-time job and a full-time commitment to her church before the stroke. Her family became extremely concerned when after the stroke she stopped leaving her house.

I had been recommended to her by another doctor who thought speech therapy would help her get some of her old confidence back. It was in the fifth week that something miraculous happened -after months of virtual silence and isolation, she spoke her first FULL sentence – in front of me. Then we both had a good cry – I’m really trying to put into words the feeling that came over me as she spoke but I don’t think there are words that can do the feeling any justice. All I know is I saw her eyes glisten and then there was a twinkle.

Now take that story and multiply it many times over and you will completely understand why I love my job.